MATH - Mathematics

Alfred State courses are grouped into the following sections:

  • This course will introduce the students to the following topics: order of operations, operations on real numbers, simplifying algebraic expressions, integer exponents, solving linear equations in one variable, graphing linear equations in two variables, and applications such as geometry and modeling. Emphasis is placed on reviewing basic arithmetic skills and elementary algebra topics. Development of arithmetic skills throughout the semester is essential, therefore students will not be allowed to use calculators.

  • This course is intended for students who need more preparation to be successful in College Algebra or other courses of that level. Topics covered include: review of first degree equations, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, polynomials, factoring, radicals and rational exponents, quadratic equations, rational expressions, relations and functions and an introduction to triangle trigonometry.

  • This course includes topics such as polynomials, radicals, exponents, coordinate geometry, rational expressions and equations, and solutions to linear and quadratic equations. Students are introduced to the concept of functions and their graphs. Additional topics may include conic sections, matrices, variation, and nonlinear inequalities. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving. A graphing calculator is required. Students cannot receive credit for MATH 1033 if they have credit for MATH 1054.

  • This course includes topics such as polynomials, radicals, exponents, coordinate geometry, rational expressions and equations, and solutions to linear and quadratic equations. Students are introduced to the concept of functions and their graphs. Additional topics may include conic sections, matrices, variation, and nonlinear inequalities. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving. A graphing calculator is required. The course is designed to give students additional time above that allotted in MATH 1033 working on mastery of concepts and skills in the student learning outcomes.

  • This course is designed primarily for the student who needs a foundation in algebra and trigonometry for the study of calculus. The concept of function and graphical representation of functions is stressed. Topics covered include: real numbers; algebra of real numbers including equations and inequalities; functions and their graphs including polynomial, rational expressions, logarithmic and exponential, trigonometric; algebra of the trigonometric functions including identities, equations, polar coordinates, complex numbers, systems of equations.

  • This course includes a review of functions, an introduction to the concept of limits and a study of the techniques of differentiation and integration of algebraic functions with applications to the various technologies. A graphing calculator is required. Credit for MATH 1063 Technical Calculus I will not be given if student receives credit for MATH 1084 Calculus I.

  • A survey of differential calculus and its application to business, including management, finance and economics. Major topics include limits, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions and limits, and multi-variable functions. Applications include marginals, maxima/minima, growth and decay, linear models. Credit for MATH 1083 will not be allowed if student has received credit for MATH 1063.

  • Designed for the student intending to continue his/her education in mathematics, science or engineering. The course will include a review of functions, an introduction to the concept of limits, and a study of the derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions and their applications. A graphing calculator is required. Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 1063 and MATH 1084.

  • This is a 3 credit, one-semester course which provides an introduction to and understanding of the basic concepts of statistics. Actual computation will be minimal; computers will be used whenever calculations are necessary. Emphasis will be placed on the meaning of statistical results. Content will include sampling, experiments, measurement, organizing data, and statistical indices. Optional topics include probability, time trends, survey design and basic inference concepts.

  • This course is the first of a two semester sequence in statistics. It covers mainly descriptive techniques such as data collection, organization techniques, measures of center, spread, and position. Other topics covered include: probability, probability distributions, normal and binomial distributions, correlation and regression. Requires a "C" or better in 1003 or 1004 or 1024 or an appropriate placement score.

  • This is a one semester course whose basic objective is to develop an interest and appreciation for Mathematics in students with little background in the subject. Included in the course are topics from the following areas: Problem Solving, Inductive Reasoning, Logic, Sets, Probability, Statistics, Consumer Math, and Geometry. It may also include topics from the following areas: History of Math, Number Systems, Metric, Algebra, Linear Programming, Finite Math, Matrices, Computer Applications.

  • This course is designed for curricula where quantitative reasoning is required. The course content includes critical thinking skills, arithmetic and algebra concepts, statistical concepts, financial concepts, as well as numerical systems and applications. A graphing calculator is required. This is an entry level course and requires three years of high school math equivalent to NYS Course 1, 2, and 3; or Math A and B.

  • The content of this course will apply geometrical truths in a variety of contexts, including knots, tessellations and graphical symmetry. In addition, it will cover some principles of Gestalt perceptual properties, the exploration and creation of models of geometric art from other cultures, and any additional material deemed suitable by the instructor. The material will involve experimentation by the student in a geometric forum to discover or verify properties of two- and three-dimensional objects and patterns.

  • This course is designed for the college student who has demonstrated mastery of algebra skills and techniques. Topics include trigonometric functions and their properties with the study of identities, formulas, equations, and graphs. Also included are the solution of right and oblique triangles using the law of sines and cosines. In addition, time is spent exploring logarithmic and exponential functions. Emphasis is placed on contextual applications and problem solving. A graphing calculator is required. Credit cannot be received for both MATH 2043 and MATH 1054.

  • A continuation of MATH 1063 with further study in differentiation and integration of both the algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications will be included in each topic. An introduction to Matrix Algebra may be included. Graphing Calculator required. Student cannot receive credit for MATH 2074 if they have received credit for MATH 1084.

  • A continuation of MATH 1084 with a concentrated study of integration techniques along with applications. Applications include but are not limited to areas, volumes, arc length, and work problems to name a few. The course involves the methods of integration and applications as they apply to both the algebraic and transcendental functions. Infinite Series will be included. Graphing Calculator required. Student cannot receive credit for both MATH 2094 and MATH 2074.

  • This is a one-semester (non-calculus based) course which covers descriptive as well as inferential statistics. Included are topics on collecting, organizing, and summarizing data. Other topics include correlation and regression, probability, normal and binomial probability distributions, normal approximation to the binomial, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and nonparametric statistics.

  • A continuation of MATH 1123 emphasizing probability distributions with predictive and inferential aspects of statistics: the normal distribution with applications, central limit theorem, hypothesis testing and estimation as applied to the mean, standard deviation, and proportions. Other topics include normal approximation to binomial, Chi-Square applications, linear regression, correlation, and nonparametric statistics. Use of calculators for analysis and computer statistical packages are utilized.

  • This course is designed for Information Technology and Mathematics and Science students. The course will introduce and discuss the following topics: functions, relations, sets, logic, counting methods, methods of proof, network graphs and trees, algorithmic analysis, complexity and computability, and matrices. A graphing calculator is required.

  • A student may contract for from one to four credit hours of independent study in mathematics through an arrangement with an instructor of mathematics. The student and instructor will develop a course of study which must be approved by the department chair and the school dean. The instructor and the student will confer regularly regarding the student's progress.

  • This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Topics covered include solution of systems of linear equations, linear independence, matrix algebra, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, orthogonality, and least squares problems.

  • A student may contract for one to six credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chair. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

  • A student may contract from one to four credit hours of independent study in mathematics through an arrangement with an instructor of mathematics. The student and instructor will develop a course of study which must be approved by the department chairperson and the school dean. The instructor and the student will confer regularly regarding the student's progress.

  • This course is designed as a continuation of MATH 2094. Topics will include: parametric equations, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, vectors and vector valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives and applications, multiple integrals, and vector analysis, including Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, and Gauss' theorem. The course will include several major projects outside of class.

  • This is the beginning study of the solution of differential equations with emphasis on both analytic and numerical solutions. Topics include first and second order differential equations and their solutions, series solutions, Laplace transforms, linear equations of higher order, numerical solutions or ordinary differential equations using Euler and Runge-Kutta methods, and the use of Eigenvalue methods to solve linear systems. In addition, this course emphasizes the development of differential equations as mathematical models for a variety of practical applications.

  • This course is designed for the engineering technology student. It covers techniques for comparing alternative projects based on economic considerations; time value of money; present worth; equivalent uniform annual cost; rate of return on investment; minimum cost life; expected value; decisions under risk; effects of income tax and inflation.

  • This calculus-based course offers the theoretical basis for probability and statistics related to engineering applications. Topics include data analysis techniques, random variables, expectation, important probability distributions and densities, inferences concerning one or more means and standard deviations. Reliability, correlation and regression, curve fitting, and quality control charts are introduced. Graphing calculators are required. Computer applications may be included.