MECH - Mechanical Engineering Technology

Alfred State courses are grouped into the following sections:

  • This course prepares students who are new to the mechanical engineering technology field for success at the college level. Topics covered include mechanical engineering technology as a career, engineering library usage, problem solving techniques, measurement systems, right triangle geometry, dimensional analysis, significant figures, unit conversion, and data collection and analysis. Career options and opportunities will be presented using guest speakers from industry.

  • This course prepares students who are new to the mechanical engineering technology field for success at the college level. Topics covered include mechanical engineering technology as a career, engineering library usage, problem solving techniques, measurement systems, right triangle geometry, dimensional analysis, significant figures, unit conversion, and data collection and analysis. Career options and opportunities will be presented using guest speakers from industry.

  • This lab introduces first year students to a skill set that is required of all students in the Mechanical Engineering Technology Departments. Through both group and individual assignments, students will produce professional process documentation, organized solutions to basic engineering problems, engineering diagrams, and engineering presentations. The lab will require the use of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Visio.

  • This is an introductory 2D Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) class where students will learn visualization, sketching, and geometric construction of basic mechanical components. This course will illustrate fundamental drafting techniques that implement graphical communication through the use of the Alphabet of Lines, Orthographic Projection, and Section Views. Using CAD, students will learn to create working industrial drawings that adhere to industrial standards.

  • This course is a continuation to the fundamental concepts of 2D Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) that is discussed in MECH 1012, CAD I. Students will learn how to create working industrial detail and assembly drawings of mechanical components that can be used for fabrication. This course will also use industrial standards such as ASME/ANSI Y14.5M for Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing to facilitate the communication of geometry requirements for associated features on detail components and assemblies.

  • Fundamental principles of air conditioning and air conditioning systems. Presentation of psychometric principles and processes, equipment selection, heating and cooling load calculations and heating system principles including forced warm air, hot water, electric and steam systems and system components. Principles and practices of heating, air conditioning system design, operation and control.

  • This course is a first semester, freshman level course. It is a broad introductory study of the basic characteristics of engineering materials. The course will emphasize the selection of metals, plastics, ceramics, and composites for mechanical design purposes. The relationships of structure, material properties, and material selection to the design/ manufacturing process will be emphasized.

  • Graphics/CAD involves the visualization, sketching, and geometric construction of mechanical components. Students will layout and create 2D working industrial drawings that adhere to industry standards. This course will illustrate CAD drawing construction techniques that implement graphical communication through the use of the alphabet of lines, orthographic projection, section views, auxiliary views and the creation of assembly and detail mechanical components.

  • This manufacturing processes/machine tool lab is a supplement to MECH 1643 (or equivalent) aimed at exposing the students to laboratory exercises which will illustrate or support the concepts introduced in a manufacturing processes lecture course. Equipment covered in this lab includes: lathes, grinders, milling machines, band saws, drill presses, sheet metal forming, precision measurement devices etc. As time or student experience permit, the topic of basic C.N.C. machine operations and programs may be introduced.

  • The basic equipment, processes and service required to produce a product are studied. This course is designed to give the student the knowledge and vocabulary to generally comprehend the complex and inter-related functions that must be accomplished to produce the end product. The equipment covered in this course includes: lathes, grinders, milling machines, planers, shapers, band saws, drill presses, etc. The processes covered include the making of iron and steel, hot and cold forming, machining, welding, brazing, soldering, electro-discharge machining, grinding, etc.

  • Applications of fluid mechanics and thermodynamic principles to testing and evaluation of appropriate equipment or systems. Laboratory evaluation, development of concepts and applications of instrumentation for data acquisition/data reduction on pumps, compressors, fans, nozzles, orifices, and pipe flow.

  • An introduction to fluid mechanics and thermodynamics with emphasis upon the inter-relationships between the subject areas. Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid flow with consideration of the energy relationships and introduction to compressive flow and gas dynamics. Thermodynamic analysis of basic systems and thermodynamic cycles.

  • Basic principles involved in the transformation of heat into mechanical energy. Study of variations in design of various components used in the internal combustion engine and the refrigeration system. An emphasis is placed on the general arrangement and construction practices used by equipment manufacturers.

  • Advanced CAD is a continuation of the basic drafting standards and techniques facilitated through the course pre-requisite, MECH 1603. Delving into other mechanical drafting disciplines, this course will help students develop additional skill sets required in a variety of other mechanical fields. This course will cover, but not be limited to, machine design, weldments, structural steel, process piping, and pressure vessels.

  • This course is a study of introductory mechanics through the application of the principles of statics. Students will focus on the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Additional topics will include centroids, centers of gravity, and analysis of structures, friction, area, and mass moments of inertia. The course includes a basic study of strength and rigidity of mechanical elements in tension, compression, shear, and bending.

  • This course will emphasize the application of mechanical design for industrial machinery. The lecture material for this course will be enhanced through a laboratory experience using design techniques that include the creation of working industrial drawings, parametrically driven spreadsheet solutions of design problems, component sizing and dimension determinations. The course will include the study of mechanical power systems such as gear trains, belt and chain drives, linkages, clutch-coupling brake components, torque transmission devices, shaft and component design calculations.

  • This course is a study of introductory mechanics through the application of the principles of statics. Students will focus on the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Additional topics will include centroids, centers of gravity, and analysis of structures, friction, area and mass moments of inertia. The course will also emphasize the importance of problem-solving in statics by using algebraic and trigonometric computations.

  • This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. Topics include psychometric principles and processes, equipment selection, heating and cooling load calculations and heating system principles including forced warm air, hot water, electric and steam systems and geothermal heating and cooling systems.

  • This course is a study of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) using a variety of software, programming languages and methods to produce Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining programs. Programming languages include Machinist/Conversational, Word Address and APT. CAM software is used to develop detailed CAD drawings, generate machine tool cutter paths and to develop the machining programs via post processing for specific CNC machine tools. Laboratory exercises include programming, machine tool setup and machine operation.
  • This course will emphasize the application of mechanical design for industrial machinery. The lecture material for this course will be enhanced through a laboratory experience using design techniques that include the creation of working industrial drawings, parametrically driven spreadsheet solutions of design problems, and component sizing and dimension determinations. The course will include the study of mechanical power systems such as gear trains, belt and chain drives, linkages, clutch-coupling brake components, torque transmission devices, shaft and component design calculations.

  • A study of the chemistry of hydrocarbon families obtained from crude oil, their refinement and use of fuels and lubricants. Physical characteristics of various fuels and lubricants and ASTM testing procedures. Methods to determine the air fuel ratios through exhaust gas analysis. Study fo engine performance characteristics. Study of electronic engine controls and automotive systems. Experiments and demonstrations covering combustion phenomena, injection, ignition, lubrication and emission systems, dynamometer characteristics and test instrumentation.

  • This course supplements the study of manufacturing processes with emphasis on techniques, processes and factors that contribute to manufacturing management decision making. Previous manufacturing process exposure is desirable but not essential.

  • This course is an introduction to 3D solid modeling techniques utilizing feature-based, constraint-based parametric design. This course encourages the student to visualize parts in the 3D world and have a “design intent” plan for each part in which they will design. This will help in the arrangement of assemblies, parts, features, and dimensions to meet design requirements.

  • This course will emphasize the application of mechanical design for industrial machinery. The lecture material for this course will be enhanced through a laboratory experience using design techniques that include the creation of working industrial drawings, parametrically driven spreadsheet solutions of design problems, and component sizing and dimension determinations. This course will include the study of linear motion devices, fluid power, rigid coupling design, and flywheels.

  • The course will emphasize applications of material involving the two basic concepts of dynamics, i.e., kinematics and kinetics and will introduce the students to vibrations. The course will include the study of levers, links, slide mechanisms, scotch yoke and the principles of force, torque, velocity, acceleration, inertia and friction. The course will use the principals of Equilibrium, Work-Energy and Impulse-Momentum along with Newton's Second Law to examine a variety of problems.

  • This course will emphasize the application of mechanical design for industrial machinery. The lecture material for this course will be enhanced through a laboratory experience using design techniques that include the creation of working industrial drawings, parametrically driven spreadsheet solutions of design problems, and component sizing and dimension determinations. This course will include the study of linear motion devices, fluid power, rigid coupling design and flywheels.

  • Advanced CAM is a follow up course to MECH 3204/3203 CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) and MECH 1423 (Intro to Solid Modeling). The course will introduce advanced Computer Aided Manufacturing topics such as APT (Automatically Programmed Tools) programming, additional CNC machine programming, solid modeling using Mastercam and/or Pro/E and Reverse Engineering Projects using a Coordinate Measurement Machine/System (CMM).

  • A basic study of robotics and automation. The course will emphasize applications of robotic devices and mechanisms in industrial and commercial applications. The study will be enhanced by laboratory experience where the student will study computer programming of robot mechanisms, and the different types of mechanisms by which robots are operated. The course will include the study of computer programming, electrical, electronic and microprocessor control and sensing detection devices and the mechanical and hydraulic linkage power devices involved in the robots.

  • This course introduces students to the electronic components commonly used to monitor and control mechanical systems. Topics include principles of measurement, instrumentation, data acquisition, and control systems with an emphasis on mechanical engineering technology applications. Students build simulated control systems using switches and both traditional and solid state relays common on modern industrial machines. Safety interlock systems, delay circuits, and motor circuits are designed and wired.

  • A student may contract for one to five credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chair. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

  • This course is a calculus-based study of advanced concepts in Mechanics of Materials. It addresses the behavior of deformable mechanical components when subjected to tension, compression, torsion, flexure/bending or a combination of these loads. Extensive use is made of free body diagrams as well as Mohr's Circle for stress and strain. Experience is gained in the analysis of beam deflection, shafts in torsion, power, column buckling and thin walled pressure vessels.

  • A student may contract for one to five credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chairperson. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

  • This course is a study of advanced concepts in designing machine elements for static and dynamic applications. Major topics include structural steel selection and welded structure design, lubricants and the viscosity/temperature relationship, stress analysis and failure theories of machine elements, reliability engineering including Weibull analysis, planetary gear set design, and hydraulic system design including accumulators, pumps, and circuit design.

  • Tool, Die & Fixture design is a specialized phase of manufacturing that develops the tooling and work holding devices for manufacturing operations. This course will introduce the student to the design of tools, machining tooling, jigs and fixtures and other work holding devices. Students will be required to create working industrial drawings for various work holding devices and fixtures for a myriad of metal removal applications.

  • The finite element method is a numerical method for solving engineering problems. This course will introduce engineering technology students to the principles of finite element method by formulating differential equations for solving simple engineering- oriented problems in the areas of structural analysis, heat transfer and fluid flow. The students will also learn to apply a programming environment such as VBA for methods in solving more complex finite element applications by iterative means.

  • This course covers the basic principles involved in the transformation of heat into mechanical energy. Fundamentals of the heat engines and turbomachinery including hydraulic, steam and gas turbines, compressors, pumps as well as reciprocating and rotary engines will be discussed. Study of alternative energy technologies and variations in design of various components will also be covered. An emphasis is placed on the general arrangement and construction practices used by equipment manufacturers, with an objective to apply knowledge and adapt to emerging technologies and applications.

  • This course is an introduction to the theory and application of continuum fluid mechanics. Fluid properties and state relations are studied. Incompressible laminar and turbulent flows are investigated using control volume, Reynolds Transport Theorem, and momentum and energy equations. Navier-Stokes Equations are developed. Dimensional analysis, Buckingham Pi Theorem and modeling are covered. Flow rate, pipe sizing and minor losses in pipe systems are addressed.

  • The theory and application of thermodynamics to pumps, compressors, turbines, heat exchangers; power cycles - Carnot, Rankine, Otto, Diesel, Stirling, and Brayton; refrigeration cycles - Carnot compression, absorption, gas; heat pump; problem-solving on ideal as well as actual cycles, psychrometry, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium.

  • The concepts and the practices of quality control, precision measurements and inspection needed in the manufacturing environment are studied. Advanced concepts of direct and indirect measurements, contact and non-contact gauging, angular measurement and surface texture/finish are covered. Expanded coverage of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing and drawing specifications as related to inspection will be emphasized.

  • This course is designed to provide a general knowledge of the various components and elements of devices utilized in a manufacturing process system design. The emphasis is on use, selection and specification of the components, not on the aspects of individual mechanical design principles best left to the mechanical engineers and designers. The students will be able to select and specify individual "machine elements" or incorporate them into a system.

  • This is an upper lever design course for all aspects of fluid power systems. Both hydraulic and pneumatic systems are covered. Topics covered in this class include pneumatic circuits, hydraulic power systems, hydrostatic transmissions, and electro-hydraulic control systems. Emphasis will be placed on system design and hydraulic and pneumatic component specification. The course prepares students to sit for the Hydraulic Specialist industry certification exam hosted by the National Fluid Power Society.

  • This course will introduce engineering technology students to the principles of computational methods such as iterative processes, finite difference and finite element methods in the solution of engineering-oriented problems in the areas of structural analysis, heat transfer and fluid flow. The students will also learn to apply a programming environment such as VBA in a structured manner for solving complex applications by iterative means. A commercial finite element analysis software system will be used as a solver for large-scale 2D and 3D models.

  • This course evaluates the concepts of energy and identifies how it relates to current and future technology. Topics include the data analysis of various types of energy systems, conversion among the several forms of energy, environmental impacts, and cost analyses. Lecture is supported by laboratory activities that may include: experiments, data collection and analysis, field trips to energy production facilities, design activities, and a final group project emphasizing principles discussed and experienced throughout the lecture and laboratory portions of the course.

  • This course is a study of the physical effects of heat transfer phenomena including conduction, convection, and radiation. This will include the concepts of control volume analysis, conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy, steady state and transient conduction, laminar and turbulent convection and phase change. A wide range of engineering problems will be presented to the students for solution using algebraic, differential and/or finite-difference methods.

  • The course initially develops a foundation in analyzing elementary single and two degree of freedom systems subjected to natural and various types of forced motion. Using this foundation, multi-degree of freedom systems are investigated for both natural and forced motion. Modeling, damping, resonance, force transmissibility and modal analysis are discussed. Emphasis is placed on practical vibrations problems in several engineering fields. In-class demonstrations supplement the theory development.

  • Simulation is the process of building a model of a system or decision problem, and experimenting with the model to obtain insight and support decision making. This course introduces students to computer based simulation and modeling with applications to all areas of business, engineering, and industry where management, strategic and operational decision making can be enhanced through the modeling and analysis of complex systems.

  • Six-Sigma is a quality improvement methodology structured to reduce product or service failure rates to a negligible level (roughly 3.4 failures per million opportunities). The Six-Sigma process encompasses all aspects of a business, including management, service delivery, design, production and customer satisfaction. This course explores the principles and practices of Six-Sigma in manufacturing oriented industries. Students will be introduced to the key concepts of Six-Sigma to better prepare them to support a company's continuous improvement efforts.

  • Plant and Process Design is a course that studies the layout and design or redesign of manufacturing facilities to develop part or process production in the most cost effective manner. Current increased productivity trends such as Lean Manufacturing, Agile Manufacturing, Just in Time, etc. will be studied. Work flow and process analysis will be included and plant layout and design software will be utilized for simulated projects.

  • This course covers such topics as recognizing and using the proper probability distribution to model product times to failure, the analysis of life data to determine the reliability characteristics and to achieve reliability improvement of a product or a process. Also covered are concepts and methods for the design, testing, and estimation of component and system reliabilities, reliability design and implementation, and design procedures that are necessary to insure a reliable product or process.

  • Advanced concepts in designing machine elements for static and dynamic applications. Special techniques of design will utilize finite element and parametric computer software. Particular emphasis is placed on designing hydrodynamic bearings, welded machine frames for steady and fatigue loads, stepped shafts for fatigue design failure theories. Flywheels with brake and clutch systems.

  • This course provides an understanding of the fundamentals concepts in automation and manufacturing and expands the concepts of Lean Manufacturing introduced in previous courses. It is an integrated approach to efficient manufacturing with emphasis on synchronized production, takt time, quick changeover, cell design, visual factory, value stream-mapping, one-piece flow, and lean metrics.

  • Students will complete supervised field work in a selected business, industry, government or educational setting. Students carry out a planned program of educational experiences under direct supervision of an owner, manager or supervisor of technology in an organization. Each intern will be supervised by a member of the faculty. Written and oral reports and a journal of work experience activities will be required. Evaluation will be based on the quality of experiences gained from the internship.