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Campus News

Homecoming and Family Weekend 2016 among best ever

Posted Date: Friday, October 21, 2016 - 10:30

With pristine weather and such a large number of attendees showing off their Pioneer Pride, organizers are counting this year’s Homecoming and Family Weekend as one of the best the college has ever had.

“I think the weekend was wonderful,” said Colleen Argentieri, director of Alumni Relations, and co-chair of the Homecoming and Family Weekend Committee. “Not only did the weather cooperate, but we could not have ordered a more perfect weekend, in terms of attendance.”

students taking a selfie in front of a firework
Students take a selfie to capture the fun at the fireworks display.

Indeed, terrific weather and high attendance were two consistent themes throughout this year’s Homecoming and Family Weekend, which took place Oct. 14-15, beginning with Friday’s ribbon-cutting for the new Sustainable Advanced Manufacturing Center on the Wellsville campus. Legislators, college leaders, students, faculty, staff, and community members all packed into the brand-new $5 million, 16,000-square-foot facility to celebrate its opening. The event also kicked off a yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary of the School of Applied Technology campus.

Later that night, the spirit rally and bonfire drew a large crowd of students, faculty, staff, and families, who also enjoyed plenty of goodies and a spectacular fireworks show that lasted more than 20 minutes. Immediately following the fireworks was the always-popular Alfred’s Got Talent show.

“Alfred’s Got Talent was great again this year,” said Mallory Morehouse, coordinator of Orientation and Family Programming, and Homecoming and Family Weekend Committee co-chair. “We had a packed house and there was lots of energy in the auditorium. I’m so happy to be a part of this annual event. It’s always one of my favorite things to plan and execute.”

Friday night’s Basketball Midnight Madness, in which the college community was introduced to the 2016-17 men’s and women’s basketball teams, was one of a number of athletic events that were well-attended throughout the weekend, including the dodgeball competition, the Race for a Cure 5K Run/Walk, and various sports games.

“In my opinion, this was the best Homecoming and Family Weekend ever,” said Paul Welker, sports information director, and Homecoming and Family Weekend Committee member. “Pioneer Pride from students, faculty, staff, and alumni was in full effect.”

Attendees also turned out in droves for a number of other events throughout the weekend, from the Greek tailgate and chili cook-off, to the car show, to the Eric Mina and Spidey show, which featured a fun mix of hypnosis and comedy.

“I agree that this was one of the best Homecoming and Family Weekends thus far,” Argentieri said. “There were more alumni present than in previous years, and we had several conversations with both alumni and family members who were extremely pleased and excited to see the festivities, as well as the many wonderful things happening at the college. It is so gratifying to see such positive results from the effort put forth, and it is truly beginning to feel as though we are building the ‘tradition’ we often discuss with this event.”

Scenic Pioneer Trail hiking system opens

Posted Date: Friday, October 14, 2016 - 13:30

Offering 4.5 miles of trails and gorgeous views of nearby scenery, Alfred State’s Pioneer Trail system is now officially open.

Located within a 200-acre wooded area, the Pioneer Trail includes three hikes to challenge all levels of physical fitness, while exploring the forest, discovering wildlife, and taking in the scenery. All trails begin and end at the parking area located behind and above the Orvis Activities Center (parking lot 24).

Each of the three trails is designated with a different-colored hiker icon: blue for the Pioneer Fitness Trail, green for the Happy Valley Trail, and yellow for the Cross Country Trail.

The one-mile Pioneer Fitness Trail offers a novice-to-intermediate challenge to trail-goers, and also features fitness stations. The intermediate-to-difficult one-and-a-half-mile Happy Valley Trail offers some significant climbs and allows hikers to explore what was originally developed as the Happy Valley Ski Hill.

The two-mile Cross Country Trail is designed for running, walking, and cross-country skiing. It delivers scenic views of the village, college, and athletic fields, and is novice-to-intermediate in level of difficulty.

To mark the opening of the trails, the college held a ribbon-cutting ceremony, attended by students, faculty, and staff. Welcoming everyone in attendance was Spencer Peavey, assistant vice president for Student Affairs.

“These trails will offer students an additional outlet on campus for fitness and recreation,” he said. “They will also offer faculty and staff members a great opportunity during breaks.”

President Dr. Skip Sullivan speaks during the ribbon-cutting ceremony
President Sullivan speaks during the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Pioneer Trail hiking system.

Peavey was one of numerous individuals and groups who helped make the trail system a reality. Credit also goes to President Dr. Skip Sullivan, Building Trades Assistant Professor Mark Payne and his heavy equipment operations students who helped create paths throughout the trail system, Student Senate, and Vice President for Student Affairs Gregory Sammons.

Amy Miller, coordinator of Civic Engagement and residence director of Main Gate A, mentioned that clubs and organizations have the opportunity to sponsor a portion of the trail, and read aloud the names of those that have already committed to caring for one-tenth of a mile of the trail.

Sammons noted that the vision for the trail system has been years in the making, and is still a work in progress.

“Not only are we going to have additional organizations adopting it, but we will be adding more fitness stations,” he said. “We have more ideas and we welcome your ideas. There’s a lot of opportunity to make this a one-of-a-kind amenity.”

Such amenities as the new trail system, Sullivan said, do not happen without a lot of hard work, a lot of preparation, and a lot of people behind the scenes.

“I’m honored to stand up and say, ‘Look what we’ve got now,’” he said, adding, “Very few campuses have the aesthetics that this campus has, and we want to recognize and celebrate that.”

Speaking at the end of the ceremony was Cassandra Bull, a civic engagement advocate and an agricultural technology major from Saratoga Springs. She provided an overview of the scavenger hunt and social media challenge that followed the ceremony, both of which featured prizes for the students, who cut through the ribbon on their walk up one of the trails.

Clean energy a top priority

Posted Date: Friday, October 14, 2016 - 10:00

Joining with more than 50 other colleges and universities across New York State, Alfred State has signed the REV Campus Challenge as a pledge to implement clean energy projects on campus and in the local community.

The initiative is part of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Reforming the Energy (REV) strategy to build a clean, resilient, and affordable energy system for all New Yorkers. The REV Campus Challenge obtains commitments from two- and four-year public and private colleges and universities to demonstrate clean energy leadership in greenhouse gas emission reduction, research and development, curricula integration, and community engagement. It is a joint initiative between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA).

“The college has a long history of being a leader in sustainability, including classroom instruction, building a Zero Energy Home on the Wellsville campus, and leading a $2.8 million NYSERDA grant on clean energy training across New York State,” said Dr. Craig Clark, vice president of Economic Development at Alfred State. “We look forward to continuing to lead through the REV process.”

The initiative has identified three distinct membership levels: Participant, Achiever, and Leader. Alfred State has chosen to be a “Leader,” meaning, according to the NYSERDA website, that the college has demonstrated the value of comprehensive campus clean energy investments, is embracing clean energy research and development and curricula efforts, and is looking to increase engagement with its community.

“Alfred State students have a passion for innovation, sustainability, and helping others,” said Jonathan Hilsher, director of the Center for Civic Engagement. “This initiative will support ongoing community engagement that leverages technology and promotes practices to support clean energy and sustainability.”

Alfred State’s first step to joining the Challenge is creating or updating a roadmap for managing energy use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. As a Challenge member, Alfred State will also engage in peer-to-peer mentorship and knowledge-sharing with other institutions to increase the rate of clean energy project development.

Staff to help parents, students with financial aid process Oct. 15

Posted Date: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - 13:45

The Office of Student Records and Financial Services will participate in the annual SUNY Financial Aid Day, Saturday, Oct. 15, beginning at 9 a.m. in the EJ Brown Business Building, room 212, on the Alfred campus.

Office staff will assist students and their guests in completing and submitting the 2017-2018 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) electronically. The FAFSA is required for all financial aid, including New York State assistance. Staff will also be available to answer any questions regarding the financial aid process.

Students and parents can register by going to www.suny.edu/studentevents or by calling 1-800-342-3811. This workshop is open to all prospective college students and their families, including those who do not plan to attend Alfred State.

It will also be open to all returning Alfred State students who wish to file their 2017-2018 FAFSA electronically. Registrants will receive an email listing necessary information, including what materials students/parents will need to bring with them, building location details, and parking directions.

Prior to SUNY Financial Aid Day, participants are encouraged to obtain a Federal Student Aid ID (FSA ID) at https://fsaid.ed.gov (allow one to three business days for the Social Security Administration to verify information); a driver's license; alien registration card (for non-U.S. citizens); bank statements and investment information; FAFSA PIN number; Social Security numbers; 2015 Federal Income Tax return (or estimated); W-2 forms or other records of income earned for 2015; and 2015 untaxed income information.

SUNY's Statewide Student Financial Aid Days are offered as a service to all prospective college students and their families. The programs are designed to answer questions and provide assistance regarding the financial aid application, types of aid available, and the award process.

Forty-one programs will be offered across New York State. Students and parents should feel free to attend the program closest to where they live.

SAMC ribbon-cutting and 50th anniversary celebration scheduled

Posted Date: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 16:00

Alfred State’s new Sustainable Advanced Manufacturing Center (SAMC) will be officially dedicated on Friday, Oct. 14 at 3 p.m. The public is invited to attend the ribbon-cutting, along with a celebration of the 50th anniversary for the School of Applied Technology campus in Wellsville.

Elected leaders scheduled to attend the event include: New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul; State Sen. Catharine Young, R-Olean; State Assemblyman Joseph Giglio, R,C,I-Gowanda; and Allegany County Board of Legislators Chairman Curt Crandall, R-Belfast.

The $5 million, 16,000-square-foot facility includes large open bays for hands-on learning by welding and machine tool technology students. It was funded through the State University of New York (SUNY) 2020 Challenge Grant Program and is the first building on the Wellsville campus funded by the State of New York. The Educational Foundation of Alfred, Inc. is leasing the site to SUNY for 30 years. Empire State Development and the Western New York Regional Economic Council supported the project with $500,000 for equipment inside SAMC.

The ceremony will also kick off a yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary for the Wellsville campus. Displays will line the entrance hall to the new building, showcasing the skilled trades training available from Alfred State in culinary arts, building construction, automotive, electrical, computerized design, and manufacturing.

An historical display will include a congratulatory telegram dated Oct. 21, 1966 and addressed to the Wellsville Vocational Training School from Robert F. Kennedy, who was serving as a US Senator from New York at the time of the school’s opening.

The Wellsville campus was originally developed as an oil refinery, and was once one of the largest in the Pennsylvania oil fields. Opening in 1901, it was rebuilt by Sinclair after a major fire in 1938, and played a significant role during World War II. As regional oil supplies dwindled, the refinery struggled, closing in 1958 after a second significant fire. Many of the refinery’s buildings still stand today and are used for job training to feed high-need industries such as advanced manufacturing.

Classes began in Wellsville on Oct. 19, 1966 for 110 students enrolled in five programs taught by 10 faculty members. These five initial programs were automotive service, building construction, drafting, electrical service, and food service.

In 1966, Alfred State students and staff erect a sign in Wellsville as the first classes were held on the former Sinclair Refinery site.
In 1966, Alfred State students and staff erect a sign in Wellsville as the
first classes were held on the former Sinclair Refinery site.

Additional dates for 50th anniversary events include:

“It Takes a Village” effort brings Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative to Alfred community

Posted Date: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 11:00

Having learned earlier this year of the impact that the Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative can have on preventing interpersonal or sexual violence, a group of Alfred State and Alfred University employees recently came together to share the initiative with nearly four dozen members of the village community.

On Sept. 20, 47 community members gathered at the Terra Cotta Coffee House for a two-hour training on the Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative. In attendance were several members of each of the Alfred State-recognized Greek organizations, as well as employees of GJ’s, Alex’s, Zippy’s, BB Shenanigan’s, and AE Crandall Hook and Ladder Company.

Green Dot is a program that asks its participants to imagine a map of their community, and how every time there is an instance of interpersonal or sexual violence, a Red Dot would be placed on the area in which that occurred.

community members at Terra Cotta Coffee House for Green Dot trainingHowever, whenever a bystander intervenes in these situations or takes proactive measures to prevent these actions from occurring, each Red Dot is then replaced with a Green Dot. The goal of the program when employed is - and has been statistically proven successful - to reduce violence within that community.

In early January, four employees from Alfred State and six from Alfred University had gathered together at Finger Lakes Community College (FLCC) for a four-day Green Dot Bystander Intervention Initiative Train-the-Trainer workshop. These bystander trainings were made possible thanks to an existing federal Centers for Disease Control and Rape Prevention and Education Program grant. All SUNY campuses were eligible to participate at no cost to the school.

Both Alfred colleges then implemented separate, but similar programs on each campus. According to Alfred State Chief Diversity Officer and Title IX Coordinator Nikkie Hockenberry, “it soon became evident that the only place that was left unaffected by this program was the actual village that houses all of the students late at night and on weekends, where harmful incidents were more likely to occur, or at least begin, during these times.” She then came up with the “It Takes a Village” effort.

“It seemed like a natural partnership between the two colleges,” she said. “We are all so committed to the safety of our students, and in talking to the business owners, we all have a common goal, and in order to reach it, it really does take a village. I was thrilled with the turnout from this small community; it’s the best part about living and working in Alfred, that level of involvement. We are really an amazing community and this only further demonstrates that.”

During the community-oriented event at the Terra Cotta, Green Dot trainers Cody Herman and Hockenberry from Alfred State and Amanda Khodorkovskaya and Steve Smith from Alfred University walked participants through a scenario-based training in which they were given tools on how to safely and effectively intervene in situations where there was potential for a harmful outcome to occur.

Participants were able to dialogue about these situations and develop strategies based upon their comfort level, in which they could insert themselves into the situation to potentially change the outcome of the incident, with the common goal of keeping members of the Alfred community safe.

Participant Jack Azueta, brother of Pi Rho Zeta, said, “It was an awesome experience going through Green Dot. I now see things from a different perspective. I will use what I have learned to protect and prevent occurrences that might happen in the future."

Less than a week after the training was held, the effects were being felt in the community. GJ’s Manager Jade DellaPenna, who was present, along with several of her employees, noted an immediate change in the local nightlife.

“The Green Dot training has helped our staff find confidence in our methods, as well as garner enthusiasm in our efforts,” she said. “Preventing interpersonal or sexual violence has always been an uphill battle, and we are grateful for the community and campuses to work together on such a crucial issue.”

As part of an ongoing outreach effort, local Greek houses and businesses will be providing numbers and stories of their Green Dots on a monthly basis to Hockenberry and Herman, which will then be logged and shared with the community.

To learn more about the Green Dot Program, visit https://www.livethegreendot.com/. For more on the “It Takes a Village” Initiative, please contact Hockenberry at hockennr@alfredstate.edu.